Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Olympiad notes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    344

    Default Olympiad notes

    Olympiad is a huge events with about 700 games/round. Just one tournament hall is not enough to accommodate all players, so we have 2 halls: hall A and hall B. Hall A devoted to the best teams with top 27 team matches in Open section and top 20 matches in Women section.

    The similar situation was 4 years ago, in Batumi. However, that time it was possible for players/captains to visit another hall during the game. Not in India. You can not see "big guys" playing if your team is in tournament hall B.

    I think, in general it reflects the current trend with more and more restrictions. Can you survive with the new rule? Absolutely, but it "reduces amount of fun" from the event.

    Our ladies will play in hall A this round as they are facing strong Netherlands. National Team still needs to deserve this privilege by winning today's match. So far, we remain on 44th table as in the 1st round.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kanata, Ottawa, Ontario
    Posts
    1,169

    Default

    And that Hall B is sizeable and yet notably cramped. In my first two days here, even though I'm near the middle of the room with 16 matches to manage, the room is so big and so cramped, that the only Canadian I've seen so far is Hal walking around today. Victor, if you go for a stroll, my booth is between matches 75 & 77.

    P.S. and smiling Omar dropped by yesterday, but otherwise, I couldn't see him
    Last edited by Aris Marghetis; 07-30-2022 at 03:04 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Aris, this Olympiad you made a significant progress from match arbiter to sector arbiter. There are about 90 match arbiters for Open section and only 6 sector arbiters. Congratulations! Looks like you cover lowest 16 boards, so we would try to avoid playing in your zone.

    For the first time, we play in Hall A today.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kanata, Ottawa, Ontario
    Posts
    1,169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Plotkin View Post
    Aris, this Olympiad you made a significant progress from match arbiter to sector arbiter. There are about 90 match arbiters for Open section and only 6 sector arbiters. Congratulations! Looks like you cover lowest 16 boards, so we would try to avoid playing in your zone.

    For the first time, we play in Hall A today.
    Thanks Victor. I'm actually fifth of the six Open areas. So far, most of the matches in my area have been quite imbalanced, with very few draws. The "early draw" (<30 moves) is one of the greater challenges, as EVERY Arbiter has to remember to check for it, but so far, none in my area. Hope you stay far away in Hall A!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    344

    Default

    About imbalanced matches. I read some post on CT about accelerated pairings. I remember, FIDE used accelerated pairing on Olympiads about 15 years ago, but last 6-7 Olympiads we have normal pairings.

    I don't like accelerated pairings, especially in official events. I know, accelerated pairings were used this year on Canadian Open. However, CO was a non-official tournament with 250 players and just 9 rounds. Here, we have major official event with 180 teams and 11 rounds - a huge difference.

    While it was no upsets in round 1, we had some unexpected results already in round 2. Some teams with almost 1000 rating points advantage (total, on 4 boards) lost their match. Croatia lost to Bulgaria, Kazakhstan lost to Tajikistan, Denmark lost to Zambia (!!) and Peru lost to Guatemala (!!).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Thanks to tenacious defense by Nikolay and nice win by Razvan we extend our staying in hall A.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kanata, Ottawa, Ontario
    Posts
    1,169

    Default

    Good. I never want to see you in Hall B

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    344

    Default

    After some very good results (the best for me was a draw against Iran) we lost 0-4 to Holland. They are a very good team and rating gap is almost 200 points/board, but still... losing 0-4 is very unpleasant.

    We are still in Hall A, but bad outcome in our next match against strong Romanian team would send us back to Hall B. Like on famous "Expulsion from the garden of Eden" picture.

    As some of readers know, Eric lost on time on board 1 to Giri. Actually, it was first lost on time in my career as a chess player/captain in classical TC, however Eric had a very difficult position, and we were losing that time 0-2 with 2 bad games remaining, as Razvan was likely already losing on board 3.

    A good video is available, but I can add some points from my perspective.

    Eric made move 40 and both Anish and match arbiter (English lady) did not pay any attention. Giri was ready to make his next move (number 41) and show goes on. However, another match arbiter (there are arbiters for every match, he served on match Germany-Slovenia next to us) came to the table and started talking to our arbiter. Eric's clock was on 30:28, and after move 40 you must have at least 30:31 - as a result of increment and addition of 30 min after move 40. That means, Eric made his move 2-3 seconds later and lost on time.

    After some verification with computer the results was approved by the deputy chief arbiter. Likely, not the best choice for this important position as deputy chief arbiter. He talked 90% of the time with Anish, which was wrong - he had to discuss this issue with Eric and explain him the situation.

    Absolutely, Anish is a famous played, but arbiter still better follow the logic and talk to Eric instead. After all, Giri had no issue with the clock, Eric did. I have to mention that arbiter's level is relatively low and not appropriate for such an important event. We have better arbiters in Canada.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kanata, Ottawa, Ontario
    Posts
    1,169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Plotkin View Post
    After some very good results (the best for me was a draw against Iran) we lost 0-4 to Holland. They are a very good team and rating gap is almost 200 points/board, but still... losing 0-4 is very unpleasant.

    We are still in Hall A, but bad outcome in our next match against strong Romanian team would send us back to Hall B. Like on famous "Expulsion from the garden of Eden" picture.

    As some of readers know, Eric lost on time on board 1 to Giri. Actually, it was first lost on time in my career as a chess player/captain in classical TC, however Eric had a very difficult position, and we were losing that time 0-2 with 2 bad games remaining, as Razvan was likely already losing on board 3.

    A good video is available, but I can add some points from my perspective.

    Eric made move 40 and both Anish and match arbiter (English lady) did not pay any attention. Giri was ready to make his next move (number 41) and show goes on. However, another match arbiter (there are arbiters for every match, he served on match Germany-Slovenia next to us) came to the table and started talking to our arbiter. Eric's clock was on 30:28, and after move 40 you must have at least 30:31 - as a result of increment and addition of 30 min after move 40. That means, Eric made his move 2-3 seconds later and lost on time.

    After some verification with computer the results was approved by the deputy chief arbiter. Likely, not the best choice for this important position as deputy chief arbiter. He talked 90% of the time with Anish, which was wrong - he had to discuss this issue with Eric and explain him the situation.

    Absolutely, Anish is a famous played, but arbiter still better follow the logic and talk to Eric instead. After all, Giri had no issue with the clock, Eric did. I have to mention that arbiter's level is relatively low and not appropriate for such an important event. We have better arbiters in Canada.
    On this clock model with this setting (13) the flag will also temporarily appear (for minutes).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,697

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Plotkin View Post
    A good video is available, but I can add some points from my perspective.

    Eric made move 40 and both Anish and match arbiter (English lady) did not pay any attention. Giri was ready to make his next move (number 41) and show goes on. However, another match arbiter (there are arbiters for every match, he served on match Germany-Slovenia next to us) came to the table and started talking to our arbiter. Eric's clock was on 30:28, and after move 40 you must have at least 30:31 - as a result of increment and addition of 30 min after move 40. That means, Eric made his move 2-3 seconds later and lost on time.

    After some verification with computer the results was approved by the deputy chief arbiter. Likely, not the best choice for this important position as deputy chief arbiter. He talked 90% of the time with Anish, which was wrong - he had to discuss this issue with Eric and explain him the situation.

    Absolutely, Anish is a famous played, but arbiter still better follow the logic and talk to Eric instead. After all, Giri had no issue with the clock, Eric did. I have to mention that arbiter's level is relatively low and not appropriate for such an important event. We have better arbiters in Canada.
    The video is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2e3KISR0fk
    Though it is hard to hear what they talk about. At the end the deputy arbiter explained the situation.
    .*-1

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •