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Thread: Scandinavian Defence

  1. #1
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    Default Scandinavian Defence

    Here's the wiki on the Scandinavian - it's a fairly detailed treatment of the various lines at a shallow move number level. Notice that after 1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5, it doesn't quite make the over-simplified statement found in many books that Black loses time in this opening as a result of the usual 3.Nc3. IMHO that's a convenient half-truth to avoid going into a more complicated story when explaining things to novices. Namely, after 3...Qa5 or 3...Qd6 Black actually does have equal development to White (in terms of number of pieces deployed and an open diagonal for a bishop per side; observe also that 2.exd5 was not a developing move), but Black has committed his queen early, to an insecure square (a5 or d6), and so after some choice series of moves by White, Black will feel the need to move her again, at which point Black really has lost time in the opening due to 2...Qxd5:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scandinavian_Defense

    Below is a link to a blog entry of mine, which notably includes some suggestions of mine on what to play vs. the Scandinavian, besides that other particularly pesky and relatively uncommon first move defence by Black, the Alekhine's:

    http://www.chesscanada.info/forum/en...ing-repertoire
    Last edited by Kevin Pacey; 08-05-2018 at 05:24 PM. Reason: Adding content
    There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
    Hamlet (1.5.167-8), Hamlet to Horatio.

  2. #2
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    I find the biggest advantage of the Scandinavian at club level is that not everyone is very familiar with it and while I may lose time on the board, on the clocks it tends to be a big advantage. The Qd6 variant can also be a bit sneaky in Blitz.
    I really do need to get around to replacing it as my primary response to 1. e4 though!
    Christopher Mallon
    FIDE Arbiter

  3. #3
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    The Scandinavian at least at times has the advantage over the Caro-Kann (another solid defence that has a similar pawn structure) that the latter has more frequent simplification in a number of its main lines. There is also the hope that Black's play can be improved on in a number of critical Scandinavian lines, time loss (which at least sometimes comes with a silver lining) aside. I normally prefer to play other stuff as Black, though, as I fear trying to make/find such improvements might take a bit of work on my part, and something might not quite pan out sooner or later in this perhaps slightly suspect defence all the same (not being, say, a totally confident GM myself).
    Last edited by Kevin Pacey; 07-24-2018 at 08:16 PM. Reason: Grammar
    There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
    Hamlet (1.5.167-8), Hamlet to Horatio.

  4. #4
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    Today I've added a link to a blog entry of mine, in my first post of this thread.
    There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
    Hamlet (1.5.167-8), Hamlet to Horatio.

  5. #5
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    Here's an interesting opening trap that can arise from the Scandinavian (in this case, benefiting Black):


    [Event ""]
    [Site ""]
    [Date ""]
    [Round ""]
    [White ""]
    [Black ""]
    [Result "0-1"]

    1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qd6 4.d4 Nf6 5.Nf3 a6 6.Bc4 {This looks rather natural, and has been played fairly often. In the position after Black's 5th move, the main line in Chess Assistant 16 for 3...Qd6, the most common move for White is 6.g3.} b5 {Again [for another move, anyway] we follow CA16's most common sequence.} 7.Bb3 Bb7 8.Ne5 {Castling is slightly more common here, and also is somewhat preferable} e6 9.0-0 {Falling for the trap! Best was 9.Bf4, though even here Black can still happily play 9...c5, or settle for 9...Nc6.} 9...c5 {Threatening to use the familiar Noah's Ark trap move ...c4 vs. the B/b3, a tactical pattern borrowed from the Ruy Lopez. White must now lose some material, as his d-pawn is guarding his N/e5.} 10.Bf4 c4 {Black presses on regardless. Now White can wreak some havoc with the N/e5, but it shouldn't help him.} 11.Nxf7 {Relatively best is 11.Bxc4, but Black still ought to win. In case of 11.Ng6 Qc6 12.d5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5, Black can then play 13...fxg6! when he is winning, as 14.Nc7+ is met by 14...Kf7.} Qc6 12.d5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 Kxf7 14.Ne3 cxb3 {White is busted.} 0-1
    There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
    Hamlet (1.5.167-8), Hamlet to Horatio.

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